New Ways Of Seeing: Favianna Rodriguez On Social And Cultural Justice In Print

California-based artist Favianna Rodriguez holds many roles and titles. What they all have in common is the aim to empower fellow creatives disrupt the status quo of social and cultural justice

New Ways Of Seeing: Adrian Brandon On Police Brutality In Colour

In this powerful series dubbed “Stolen”, Adrian Brandon features Black individuals whose lives have been cut short by police brutality. He uses time as a medium to define how long each portrait is coloured, with one year of life equating to one minute of colour

New Ways Of Seeing: Donna Bassin On Grief Through Film

Drawing from her experience as a clinical psychologist, award-winning artist Donna Bassin explains how she came to capture the portraits of people who feel “invisible and un-entitled to their place in this American moment.”

New Ways Of Seeing: Safwat Saleem On Belonging With Graphic Design

Safwat Saleem has known many home countries across his lifetime. Inspired by a sense of belonging, his “Concerned But Powerless” series combines many different mediums to create satirical work that explores the social issues foregrounded by the election of Donald Trump

HONEST CONVERSATIONS ABOUT SEX, CONNECTION, AND THE YEAR WE DIDN’T TOUCH ANYBODY

Experts on what happens to us when we quite literally lose touch

Expensive Taste

Culture and cuisine are inextricably linked. We desire one as insatiably as the other. So, if this intoxicating duo is innately ingrained, is it possible our most luxurious tastes are simply part of human nature?

New Ways Of Seeing: Sharon Walters On Under-Representation Through Collage

For the London-based artist, her ongoing series “Seeing Ourselves” is as much about an exploration of under-representation than it is about celebrating her own “Blackness”. Here, she discusses creating hand-assembled collages to empower fellow Black women

New Ways Of Seeing: Peter Drew On White Australia In Street Art

Australian born Peter Drew rose to prominence thanks to his art that depicted victims of the “White Australian Policy”. Speaking to GRAZIA, he reflects on how his work has evolved into street art and his hope to connect different identities