george floyd fashion industry

There are so many things to be said about the current state of affairs in the United States. Words alone will serve the death of George Floyd – and everything he and it stands for – a great injustice. So instead of collecting my thoughts and pouring them onto a page, let us look to those around us who have used their voice to incite peace, power and change.

Here, a look at some of the most powerful reactions to the death of George Floyd from some of the most powerful people in our fashion industry.

Gucci
“Words by Cleo Wade.”

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Words by @cleowade

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Proenza Schouler
“Support:
blacklivesmatter.com
justiceforbigfloyd.com
joincampaignzero.com
www.naacpldf.org

Robert Mapplethorpe ‘Embrace’ 1982”

 

Sarah Mower, Fashion Critic
I’ve been thinking hard about what is honest to say as a white British woman about systemic institutional racism. What is happening in the United States over the murder of George Floyd is harrowing and appalling. I condemn racism in all its forms, but what I know is that it isn’t enough to say that. It’s the duty of all white people to listen, examine, question and actively reeducate ourselves, in the UK. Institutional racism is as rife here – deaths of black people in custody, the disproportionate death toll amongst BAME communities in the pandemic are just two aspects of the scandalous inequalities which persist in British society. Reflecting on this, I’ve been going over exactly how my own British education, from infants school to Leeds University managed to omit :the bloody and oppressive crimes carried out by the Victorian empire; the colonial exploitation embedded in the ‘success’ of the British Industrial revolution; any mention of slavery other than in relation to the USA; the heroism of British Commonwealth citizens in the fight against fascism in WWII ;Britain’s appalling role in the partition of India; how Britain begged Caribbean men and women to come to the UK to rebuild the country after WWII, and then shat on them. Even, studying history of art under Marxists at Leeds, never was anything but eurocentic art examined.

I am ashamed. This installation of my ignorance went on a long time ago, but has the curriculum changed much since?( Comments?)It means that education has continually divided British children – either privileging them, or robbing them, according to race and background -for generations, from the day their mothers take their hands to drop them off at nursery school. It’s sunk in now that it’s the responsibility of white people to reeducate ourselves. So, in fashion, which is all I’m qualified to observe,I humbly point you to these beautiful young British leaders and teachers: @walesbonner @martine_rose @ibrahimkamara_ @campbelladdy @nicholas_daley @ahluwalia_studio @biancasaunders_ @supriya_lele @saul.nash @ashish @osmanstudio @pariafarzaneh @design.by.samuelross @rubeesamuel”

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I’ve been thinking hard about what is honest to say as a white British woman about systemic institutional racism. What is happening in the United States over the murder of George Floyd is harrowing and appalling. I condemn racism in all its forms, but what I know is that it isn’t enough to say that. It’s the duty of all white people to listen, examine, question and actively reeducate ourselves, in the UK. Insitutional racism is as rife here – deaths of black people in custody, the disproportionate death toll amongst BAME communities in the pandemic are just two aspects of the scandalous inequalities which persist in British society. Reflecting on this, I’ve been going over exactly how my own British education, from infants school to Leeds University managed to omit :the bloody and oppressive crimes carried out by the Victorian empire; the colonial exploitation embedded in the ‘success’ of the British Industrial revolution; any mention of slavery other than in relation to the USA; the heroism of British Commonwealth citizens in the fight against fascism in WWII ;Britain’s appalling role in the partition of India; how Britain begged Caribbean men and women to come to the UK to rebuild the country after WWII, and then shat on them. Even, studying history of art under Marxists at Leeds,never was anything but eurocentic art examined. I am ashamed. This installation of my ignorance went on a long time ago, but has the curriculum changed much since?( Comments?)It means that education has continually divided British children – either privileging them, or robbing them, according to race and background -for generations, from the day their mothers take their hands to drop them off at nursery school. It’s sunk in now that it’s the responsibility of white people to reeducate ourselves. So, in fashion, which is all I’m qualified to observe,I humbly point you to these beautiful young British leaders and teachers: @walesbonner @martine_rose @campbelladdy @ibkamara @nicholas_daley @ahluwalia_studio @biancasaunders_ @supriya_lele @saul.nash @ashish @osmanstudio @pariafarzaneh @design.by.samuelross @rubeesamuel

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louis vuitton
“MAKE A CHANGE. FREEDOM FROM RACISM TOWARDS PEACE TOGETHER. #BlackLivesMatter”

 

Mary Katrantzou
“GEORGE FLOYD 🖤 #justiceforgeorgefloyd”

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GEORGE FLOYD 🖤#justiceforgeorgefloyd

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jacquemus
“MY HEART 💔 @keedronbryant”

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MY HEART 💔 @keedronbryant

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Tim Blanks, Editor-at-large, Business of Fashion 
“One picture worth a million words”

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One picture worth a million words (📷@daisugano)

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Nike 
“Let’s all be part of the change. #UntilWeAllWin”

 

Jonathan Anderson, creative director, Loewe and J W Anderson
“Earlier today, I made a post that I thought was helpful about our current situation. My intentions may have been good, but my words didn’t meet the moment. I’m sorry for that.

I understand that it’s important to acknowledge—in this moment especially—the unique instances of racism and systemic oppression that Black people face. Like many of you, I have been outraged to learn the stories of Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Tony McDade, and countless others who died too soon and without justice.

There’s a James Baldwin quote that feels particularly poignant right now. “You always told me it takes time,” he said. “It’s taken my father’s time, my mother’s time. My uncle’s time. My brothers’ and my sisters’ time. My nieces’ and my nephews’ time. How much time do you want, for your ‘progress?'” It is clear that progress is overdue, and justice cannot wait. And in taking the time to say anything at all, I missed the urgency of expressing solidarity for all of you demonstrating all over the world, advocating for an anti-racist society. My heart is with you and I stand with you. I will continue do everything in my power to help and to listen. #BlackLivesMatter.”

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Earlier today, I made a post that I thought was helpful about our current situation. My intentions may have been good, but my words didn’t meet the moment. I’m sorry for that. I understand that it’s important to acknowledge—in this moment especially—the unique instances of racism and systemic oppression that Black people face. Like many of you, I have been outraged to learn the stories of Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Tony McDade, and countless others who died too soon and without justice. There’s a James Baldwin quote that feels particularly poignant right now. “You always told me it takes time,” he said. “It's taken my father's time, my mother's time. My uncle's time. My brothers' and my sisters' time. My nieces' and my nephews' time. How much time do you want, for your 'progress?'" It is clear that progress is overdue, and justice cannot wait. And in taking the time to say anything at all, I missed the urgency of expressing solidarity for all of you demonstrating all over the world, advocating for an anti-racist society. My heart is with you and I stand with you. I will continue do everything in my power to help and to listen. #BlackLivesMatter.

A post shared by Jonathan Anderson (@jonathan.anderson) on

YSL
“DISCRIMINATION HAS NO ⁣JUSTIFICATION⁣
⁣WE BELIEVE IN RESPECT ⁣
⁣⁣#blacklivesmatter”

 

Versace
“#BlackLivesMatter”

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#BlackLivesMatter

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virgil abloh, creative director off white and louis vuitton menswear
“Humanity needs our ideas the most”

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humanity needs our ideas the most

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“My image made in my image”

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“trojian horse”

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Tile Image: Instagram, @jonathananderson

thoughts?